Wednesday, February 10, 2021

February Grades 3-4 Book Club: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

 


For February's Grades 3-4 Book Club, we read the book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl. Alex and Emily was present. Here's what we discussed! 


Who does Charlie live with? Where do they live? 


What does he get as his only birthday present? And why does he eat it so slowly?

 

What would have happened if Charlie hadn't found a Golden Ticket? How would he have survived?


What role does Grandpa Joe play in Charlie's life?


Is it strange that no one ever comes out of Willy Wonka’s factory?


Tell me a little bit about the other 4 ticket winners: Augustus Gloop, Veruca Salt, Mike Teavee and Violet Beauregarde.

 

Which is the worst offense: being gluttonous (eating too much), greedy, spoiled, or lazy? Which of those do you relate to the most? (No one's judging – we're all guilty of something!)

 

Do you think that Roald Dahl believes that the parents of the contest participants are good?

 

How do the kids react when they are in the factory?

 

In what ways does Willy Wonka tempt the children to misbehave?

 

What can one tell about Willy Wonka's character? Is he likable and kind, or sneaky and cruel?

 

What is the Oompa-Loompas' purpose in the novel?

 

How does the theme of karma play a role in the story?

 

What will Charlie be like as the factory owner? Will he let children come explore, or keep it closed to the public?

 

If you could create a candy – any candy in the world – what would it taste like and what other effects would it have? Go crazy; it doesn't have to be rooted in reality. Willy Wonka certainly isn't.

 

Which would have been the most fun room in the factory to explore? Why?

 

Would you call the end of the book a happy one? Why or why not?


Would you read the sequel to this book, Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator


Please rate this book between 1 and 5, with 1 being the worst and 5 the best.

-2 Fives!


Book Club will be meeting on Wednesday, March 10 at 3:30 p.m. We will be reading The One and Only Bob (the sequel to The One and Only Ivan) by Katherine Applegate. We will be meeting via Zoom. 


Bob sets out on a dangerous journey in search of his long-lost sister with the help of his two best friends, Ivan and Ruby. As a hurricane approaches and time is running out, Bob finds courage he never knew he had and learns the true meaning of friendship and family.

Books will be available within a week. Please be sure to register so that I can email you the Zoom password!

March Grades 3-4 Book Club Suggestions

                                                            

Charlie and the Great Glass Elevator by Roald Dahl

Last seen flying through the sky in a giant elevator in Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Charlie Bucket's back for another adventure. When the giant elevator picks up speed, Charlie, Willy Wonka, and the gang are sent hurtling through space and time. Visiting the world’' first space hotel, battling the dreaded Vermicious Knids, and saving the world are only a few stops along this remarkable, intergalactic joyride.




Masters of Disaster by Gary Paulsen

Roped into wacky attempts to break world records, imitate scenes from books, and other inspired ideas, Riley and Reed follow their fearless leader Henry into the wilderness, the bull-riding ring, a haunted house, a cataclysmic collision with explosive life forms, and off the roof of a house on a bike.




Secrets at Sea by Richard Peck

In 1887, the social-climbing Cranstons voyage from New York to London, where they hope to find a husband for their awkward older daughter, secretly accompanied by Helena and her mouse siblings, for whom the journey is both terrifying and wondrous as they meet an array of titled humans despite their best efforts at remaining hidden.


Wednesday, January 13, 2021

January Grades 3-4 Book Club: Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing

 


For January's Grades 3-4 Book Club, we read the book Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume. Alex and Emily was present. Here's what we discussed! 


How does Peter get a pet turtle?


How does Peter’s mother react to his new pet? 


Why doesn’t Peter’s mother want him hanging around the park alone?


Why doesn’t Peter like Sheila very much?


What happens to Fudge when his mother leaves him with Sheila, Peter and Jimmy Fargo?


What did Sheila write on the report that upset Peter and Jimmy?


 What is Peter’s dad doing on the day Fudge and Peter were at the office?


What was Peter’s father’s idea to get Fudge to ride the Toddle-Bike? And, did it work?


What day will Peter never forget? 


Why do you think Fudge decides to swallow Dribble?


Do you think Peter sees the puppy as his reward for being a good kid? Does it make up for all he's been through?


Why does Peter need boundaries from Fudge? Is it only to protect his stuff?


Do you think that Mr. and Mrs. Hatcher treat Fudge better than they treat Peter? Why or why not?


How does living in New York City make Peter's childhood unique and interesting?


Why does Mrs. Hatcher always seem to take Fudge's side over Peter's?


What do we learn about how Peter's parents really feel about him vs. what he thinks they feel about him?


Do you think events like those in the book could ever happen? Why or why not?


Would you call the end of the book a happy one? Why or why not?


Would you read the sequels to this book? It is a series.


Please rate this book between 1 and 5, with 1 being the worst and 5 the best.


Book Club will be meeting on Wednesday, February 10 at 3:30 p.m. We will be reading Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl. We will be meeting via Zoom. 


Each of five children lucky enough to discover an entry ticket into Mr. Willy Wonka's mysterious chocolate factory takes advantage of the situation in his own way.

Books will be available within a week. Please be sure to register so that I can email you the Zoom password!


February Grades 3-4 Book Club Suggestions


The BFG by Roald Dahl

Kidsnatched from her orphange by a BFG (Big Friendly Giant), who spends his life blowing happy dreams to children, Sophie concocts with him a plan to save the world from nine other man-gobbling cannybull giants.



The Frog Princess by E.D. Baker

After reluctantly kissing a frog, an awkward, fourteen-year-old princess suddenly finds herself a frog, too, and sets off with the prince to seek the means--and the self-confidence--to become human again.



Ragweed by Avi

Ragweed, a young country mouse, leaves his family and travels to the big city, where he finds excitement and danger and sees cats for the first time.



Monday, December 14, 2020

December Grades 3-4 Book Club: Clean Getaway



For the December's Grades 3-4 Book Club, we read the book Clean Getaway by Nic Stone. Alex and Emily was present. Here's what we discussed, with help from the publisher's website. 


Reflect on the following quotes:

 

 a. “Looks like we’re both trying to make a run for it.” (p. 48)

 b. “It’s possible to know too much about the folks in your life.” (p. 77)

 c. “So people don’t have to enjoy the wrong they’re doing to do it?” (p. 85)

 d. “Man, I hate this world sometimes.” (p. 136)

 e. “They get seventeen more days. Most of them good.” (p. 211)

 

 

Guilt is a recurring theme in this book. How does guilt motivate G’ma? How does guilt affect Scoob?

 


What is your opinion of G’ma? Was she a good person? Explain the multiple facets of her character. Is anyone all good or all bad?

 


What are some lessons or universal themes in this book? Did it make you think about anything in a new way? What? And why?

 


What are your thoughts about the relationship between G’ma and G’pop? Do you agree with her choice to not bring their son to visit G’pop in prison? Do you agree with her choice to keep secrets from her son? Reflect on this relationship.



Do you think Scoob will ever tell his dad about what G’ma confessed to him? Why or why not?

 


What realization does Scoob come to when he says, “I’m sorry you lost your mom.” (p. 215) Do you think kids sometimes forget their parents are people, too?

 


What do you think of Scoob’s decision to bury G’ma’s treasure box in Mexico? What would you have done?



Do you think events like those in the book could ever happen? Why or why not?


 

Would you call the end of the book a happy one? Why or why not?



Please rate this book between 1 and 5, with 1 being the worst and 5 the best.

-4

-4


Book Club will be meeting on Wednesday, January 13 at 3:30 p.m. We will be meeting via Zoom. We will be reading Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume.

"Peter finds his demanding two-year-old brother an ever increasing problem."

Books will be available within a week. Please be sure to register so that I can email you the Zoom password!


Tuesday, December 8, 2020

January Grades 3-4 Book Club Suggestions



Crenshaw by Katherine Applegate

Jackson and his family have fallen on hard times. There's no more money for rent. And not much for food, either. His parents, his little sister, and their dog may have to live in their minivan. Again.

Crenshaw is a cat. He's large, he's outspoken, and he's imaginary. He has come back into Jackson's life to help him. But is an imaginary friend enough to save this family from losing everything?




Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume


Life with his little brother, Fudge, makes Peter Hatcher feel like a fourth grade nothing. Whether Fudge is throwing a temper tantrum in a shoe store, smearing mashed potatoes on the walls at Hamburger Heaven, or trying to fly, he's never far from trouble. He's an almost three-year-old terror who gets away with everything, and Peter's had it up to here! When Fudge walks off with Dribble, Peter's pet turtle, it's the last straw. Peter has put up with Fudge for too long. Way too long! How can he get his parents to pay attention to him for a change?




Upside Down Magic by Sarah Mlynowski, Lauren Myracle, and Emily Jenkins

It's never easy when your magic goes wonky.

For Nory, this means that instead of being able to turn into a dragon or a kitten, she turns into both of them at the same time -- a dritten.

For Elliott, the simple act of conjuring fire from his fingertips turns into a fully frozen failure.

For Andres, wonky magic means he's always floating in the air, bouncing off the walls, or sitting on the ceiling.

For Bax, a bad moment of magic will turn him into a . . . actually, he'd rather not talk about that.

Nory, Elliott, Andres, and Bax are just four of the students in Dunwiddle Magic School's Upside-Down Magic class. In their classroom, lessons are unconventional, students are unpredictable, and magic has a tendency to turn wonky at the worst possible moments. Because it's always amazing, the trouble a little wonky magic can cause . . .


Wednesday, November 18, 2020

November Grades 3-4 Book Club: Frindle


For the November's Grades 3-4 Book Club, we read the book Frindle by Andrew Clements. Luna was present. Here's what we discussed. 


What is Mrs. Granger’s famous “battle cry” that all her former students remember? 


What question does Nick ask Mrs. Granger on the first day of class to stall the lesson? How does she outsmart him? 


List the three important events that lead to Nick's big idea: renaming a pen “a frindle.” 


What exactly does Mrs. Granger mean when she says that “dog” means dog because we all agree it does? 


Why do those students want to stay after school and be punished by Mrs. Granger? Why do they consider it a “badge of honor”? 


If “ain’t” is not a proper word, how can it be in the dictionary, as Nick points out? What is Nick trying to prove when he brings this point up with Mrs. Chatham, the principal? 


Imagine that you are the reporter from the Wakefield Gazette, trying to get the scoop on the new word "frindle." What questions would you ask Mrs. Granger? How would you convince the principal to give you the real story? 


Bud Lawrence wants to own the copyright for the word "frindle." What does he plan to do with it? How can someone own the rights to a word? Explain how this is different from owning a bike or a pair of sneakers, or even a pet dog. 


When the reporter from the TV station asks Nick “What’s next for you and your new word?” Nick replies that “frindle belongs to everyone now.” How can a word belong to everyone? What does someone “do” with a word that belongs to them? 


How does the experience of inventing a new word and becoming a celebrity affect Nick? Why does he think twice about testing out his new idea: protesting the poor food in the cafeteria? 


In her letter to Nick (which he opens years later, after he’s in college), Mrs. Granger says: “A person can watch the sunset, but he cannot slow it down or stop it or make it go backward.” What do you think this observation has to do with Nick’s word? 


Why does Mrs. Granger “expect to hear remarkable things” about Nick in the future? Can you predict — based on his creativity and his restless challenging of rules and conventions — what kind of remarkable things he might go on to do? 


Can you recall the early parts of the story and Mrs. Granger’s “war” against Nick and his new word? Now that you know what her real intentions were — to intentionally make herself “the bad guy” — try to imagine what she was thinking when she posted her angry notice, or when day after day she kept all those students after school. 


Do you think Nick really knew what he was getting into when he started spreading the word “frindle”? How did Mrs. Granger — who tried to make obstacles for Nick — realize the possibility of Nick’s new word?


Please rate this book between 1 and 5, with 1 being the worst and 5 the best.

-A 3


Book Club will be meeting on Wednesday, December 9 at 3:00 p.m. We will be meeting via Zoom. Books will be available behind the Circulation Desk within a week. Please be sure to register so that I can email you the Zoom password!
For December's Book Club, we will be reading Clean Getaway by Nic Stone. 
For the life of him, William "Scoob" Lamar can't seem to stay out of trouble--and now the run-ins at school have led to lockdown at home. So when G'ma, Scoob's favorite person on Earth, asks him to go on an impromptu road trip, he's in the RV faster than he can say FREEDOM. With G'ma's old maps and a strange pamphlet called the 'Travelers' Green Book' at their side, the pair takes off on a journey down G'ma's memory lane. But adventure quickly turns to uncertainty: G'ma keeps changing the license plate, dodging Scoob's questions, and refusing to check Dad's voice mails. And the farther they go, the more Scoob realizes that the world hasn't always been a welcoming place for kids like him, and things aren't always what they seem--G'ma included.

Please be sure to register for Book Club so I know to send you the Zoom password!

February Grades 3-4 Book Club: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

  For February's Grades 3-4 Book Club, we read the book Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl . Alex and Emily was present. He...